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Enterprise Components

Geospatial Standards

Standardized maps and charts, feature data, elevation data, and imagery form the Standard Sharable Geospatial Foundation (SSGF) and are essential for a Common Operational Picture (COP). 

The 4 Types of Standard Data

Maps and charts are part of the Standard Sharable Geospatial Foundation (SSGF). Source: Tactical Pilotage Chart (TPC) from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency.
Feature data showing Transportation Ground vectors over southern New Hampshire. Feature data is part of the Standard Sharable Geospatial Foundation (SSGF). Source: NAS GGDM Profile.
Elevation data is part of the Standard Sharable Geospatial Foundation (SSGF). Source: Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data.
Imagery is part of the Standard Sharable Geospatial Foundation (SSGF). Source: NaturalVue Imagery.

Today's Standards

The Army requires a consistent understanding of the terrain to support military operations. Standards enable sharing of interoperable terrain data by defining a common language for data exchanges between systems designed independently of each other. This is why standards form the foundation for certifying that Army systems meet the Army’s geospatial interoperability requirements.

Building on Conceptual Foundation Standards, Industry Technical Standards, Defense (Allies) Standards, and American, British, Canadian, Australian and New Zealand Policy Standards, the  Army partners with the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) to develop National System for Geospatial Intelligence (NSG) - approved geospatial standards to ensure interoperability with the Army Geospatial Enterprise.

Use of common standards across Army systems ensures interoperability and enables a Common Operational Picture.

The AGE works with standards organizations.

The Army Geospatial Enterprise works closely with major standards organizations to meet the Army’s geospatial interoperability requirements.

Standard Sharable Geospatial Foundation standards are rapidly evolving and will change over time as the use of open Application Programmer Interfaces (APIs) and encodings increase. 

Six Emerging Standards

To support future challenges, the Army Geospatial Enterprise is adopting open standards and an open systems approach. This approach uses modular design and system interfaces implemented using open standards that can be verified for conformance.

As part of Army modernization, the Army Geospatial Enterprise not only uses existing standards, but actively shapes the future by participating with the Open Geospatial Consortium and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) in developing new standards, including ...

  • Route Exchange Model (REM) and Routing API (RAPI).  The purpose of REM and RAPI is to help systems, including the Army's, access and share routes and obstacles in a simple, interoperable way - both online and offline.  Together, REM and RAPI will allow applications to request and share routes from different providers, data sets, routing engines and algorithms. REM and RAPI are advancing simultaneously as both Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Candidate Standards and as National System for Geospatial-Intelligence (NSG) Standardization Implementation Guidance (SIG).
  • 3D GeoVolumes API. The 3D GeoVolumes API provides the National System for Geospatial-Intelligence (NSG) with an API and encoding to request 3D content from different providers in a simple, interoperable way.  The 3D GeoVolumes API is based on open standards and collaborative prototyping with the OGC, Testing has shown that it can be rapidly implemented in geospatial applications.  This API will simplify systems development across geospatial enterprises by providing a single interface for requesting and receiving 3D content.  
  • Next Generation Web Services. The Next Generation Web Services initiative tracks the evolution of OGC APIs to overcome the limitations of existing services and focus on modern and emerging standards such as OGC API – Features, OGC API – Tiles, OGC Tile Set Metadata, and others.
  • Portrayal. Portrayal refers to the visualization of geospatial data. Elements include the specification of map symbols, rules for how to display map symbols, guidelines for displaying text, and open standards for interoperability such as OGC API – Styles.
  • Vector Tiles. Vector tiles encode vector data, such as points, lines, and polygons, in roughly square, compact packages. They are emerging as an alternative to the raster tiles found in many web maps. Vector tiles typically are smaller in file size than existing map formats, so they require less storage and can be rendered more quickly. In addition, they can be “styled” by the user when they are displayed.
  • Releasable Basemaps. Releasable Basemaps are generated from open data sources and are not Limited Distribution (non-LIMDIS).  Consistent with National System for Geospatial-Intelligence (NSG) profiles, standards and guidance, Releasable Basemaps support US Army modernization and can be shared with allies and coalition partners.

Demonstrations

3D GeoVolumes API. The 3D GeoVolumes API was developed by the Army Geospatial Center in a collaborative effort with the OGC. This API will simplify systems development across geospatial enterprises by providing a single interface for requesting and receiving 3D content. Source: OGC