ImageGallery

Historical Photographic Analysis sample #2
Historical Photographic Analysis sample #1
Mr. Gary Blohm is the U.S. Army Geospatial Information Officer.
Mounted Mission Command enables modular and scalable solutions for on-the-move capabilities. (Photo credit: PEO C3T, U.S. Army)
The Command Post Computing Environment supports command posts and combat operations. (Photo credit: PEO C3T, U.S. Army)
Mobile Computing Supports Field Applications. Soldiers access geospatial data in the field. Geospatial data is accessible from multiple computing environments.
Geospatial Data Enables Situational Awareness.  Soldiers access information about Army units through the Army Geospatial Enterprise Portal.
Launching Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are a valuable data collection capability for the Army Geospatial Enterprise (AGE).
The Army Geospatial Enterprise Portal. Soldiers access Army Geospatial Enterprise resources and data through the Army Geospatial Enterprise
Army Geospatial Enterprise (AGE) Node. The Army Geospatial Enterprise (AGE) Node replicates multiple Army Computing Environments and supports prototyping and cer
Tactical Display for Mounted Computer Environment.  Computers and software are being developed to support mobile users. (Photo Credit: U.
Command and Control Display.  Management of Army Systems requires situational awareness provided by a Common Operational Picture (COP).
Senior Airman Matt, a geospatial analyst with the 118th Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Group based at Joint Base Berry Field in Nashville, Tenn., points to a damaged building in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Irma, September 15. The unit is currently tasked with supporting first responders during hurricane relief efforts.
Spc. Jeremy McCrae, an Engineer Soldier, with the 512th Engineer Detachment checks coordinates of an American service member’s grave in Corozal American Cemetery in Panama City, Panama, June 28, 2018, as part of a certifying program to ensure precision and accuracy at the final resting places of American service members. The pilot program is supported through a cooperative effort between the American Battle Monuments Commission, Arlington National Cemetery, the United States Army Corps of Engineers, the Army GeoSpatial Center and Product Director Combat Terrain Information Systems. (U.S. Army Photo/Courtesy USACE)
Spc. Zachary Wright, an Engineer Soldier with the 512th Engineer Detachment walks along a road in Corozal American Cemetery in Panama City, Panama, June 28, 2018, with a Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system, which works by sending out a beam of light and measuring the time it takes to return to the sensor. Wright is working as part of a certifying program to ensure precision and accuracy at the final resting places of American service members. The pilot program is supported through a cooperative effort between the American Battle Monuments Commission, Arlington National Cemetery, the United States Army Corps of Engineers, the Army GeoSpatial Center and Product Director Combat Terrain Information Systems. (U.S. Army Photo/Courtesy USACE)
Army Engineer and Navy Seabee units employed the Port Improvement via Exigent Repair (PIER) technology, assessed its viability and further matured the training construct. PIER applies modern technologies to assessment and rehabilitation of waterfront assets for use during military vessel off-on/load of equipment, supplies and personnel. The Multifunctional Assessment Reconnaissance Vessel (MARV) is a cutting-edge, unmanned vessel designed for surface and subsurface port inspections, obstacle detection and precision data capture. It makes the ingress and egress phases of multi-domain operations more efficient and faster by exploiting highly detailed hydrographic in near real-time. The data supports selection of approach vectors, harbor and pier repairs, and remediation of obstacles as well as support to shore operations using co-dependent technologies in the PIER program.
SHEMYA ISLAND, Alaska — Staff Sergeants Jacob Feyers, Brent Evans, Shane Van Alstyne, and Michael Singley, on the boat, of the 7th Engineer Dive Detachment, 84th Engineering Battalion out of Joint Base Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, set out with equipment provided by Product Director Combat Terrain Information Systems, including the Instrument Set, Reconnaissance and Surveying toolset, known as ENFIRE and the Multi-functional Assessment Reconnaissance Vessel II, or MARV II, in a mission to survey, collect the required data and ensure the future work that needs to be planned for the much calmer summer season and the extensive repair operations will have as much information as they need. Construction, design and even navigation assets will all be able to access and use use the collected data to maximize their operations. U.S. Army Photo/1st Lt. Ander Thompson
SHEMYA ISLAND, Alaska — First Class Diving Supervisor Staff Sgt. Michael Singley, conducting pre-dive supervisor checks on Staff Sgt. Eion Audet. Members of the 7th Engineer Dive Detachment, 84th Engineering Battalion out of Joint Base Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, during survey operations on Eareckson Air Station which was damaged by a storm cell in February, 2020. The 7th set out with equipment provided by Product Director Combat Terrain Information Systems, including the Instrument Set, Reconnaissance and Surveying toolset, known as ENFIRE and the Multi-functional Assessment Reconnaissance Vessel II, or MARV II, in a mission to survey, collect the required data and ensure the future work that needs to be planned for the much calmer summer season and the extensive repair operations will have as much information as they need. Construction, design and even navigation assets will all be able to access and use use the collected data to maximize their operations. U.S. Army Photo/1st Lt. Ander Thompson
Spc. Charles Vincent prepares to assemble the mobile GNSS rovers, which are used to receive location and elevation coordinates from a satellite before transferring them to the stationary base receiver. The coordinate is then linked to the base receiver’s coordinates, averaged out, and sent back to the mobile rover. They are establishing the grade for a moving rail-target system at the non-standard live-fire range at Joint National Training Center, Cincu, Romania. This project is part of Resolute Castle 17, an operation to help build relationships with the NATO alliance and enhance its capacity for joint training and response to threats within the region.
Spc. Christopher Carr (left) and Spc. William Belanger (right) with the 610th Engineer Support Company use a laser range finder to gather and record data on the Nisqually River Bridge while training with the new ENFIRE system June 5. Soldiers with the 14th Eng. Bn., spent a week training on the ENFIRE system which is a digital reconnaissance and surveying equipment instrument set. (US Army photo by Sgt. Austan R. Owen.)

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Geospatial Center is enabling a decisive edge through geospatial information dominance

The mission providing timely, accurate, and relevant geospatial information, capabilities, and domain expertise for

the Army Geospatial Enterprise in support of unified land operations